INTAGLIO DI DELFINO

AA-PRO-17155
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DOLPHIN TIGER EYE CARVING Imperial Period, 1st-2nd century AD Brown tiger eye intaglio with convex truncated cone-shaped oval-shaped yellow-gold streaks, depiction of a dolphin on sea waves. The carving of precious stones at the time of the Romans was much more than a simple addition to the...
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DOLPHIN TIGER EYE CARVING Imperial Period, 1st-2nd century AD Brown tiger eye intaglio with convex truncated cone-shaped oval-shaped yellow-gold streaks, depiction of a dolphin on sea waves. The carving of precious stones at the time of the Romans was much more than a simple addition to the manufacture of jewelry, at least until the time of the Antonini, the seal was the personal emblem that recalled the pride of family tradition or beliefs firmly professed by the owner . A sober senator, who would have branded the jewelry as effeminate, nevertheless wore carved seal stones. Furthermore, when cursive writing was not very developed, the carved gems printed in wax or clay were the only effective form to sign. From the 1st century BC the gems were carved using a large variety of stones - sardonyx, carnelian, and onyx as the rarest amethyst, aquamarine, sapphire, grenade imported from India. The main gem carvers in the service of the Romans were Greeks, the pride they drew from their art is demonstrated by the fact that they signed their works. The greatest carver was Dioskourides, maker of the seals of the Emperor, whose skill is remembered by Pliny. In the late 1st and 2nd centuries, shops also sprang up in the provinces of the Empire in addition to the old towns such as Aquileia and Rome. These include Romula (Bucharest) in Romania and a site in northern Britain, probably Carlisle. Red jasper, carnelian and nicolo were favored, but the carvers were now more interested in the models and textures rather than in the linear forms Declaration to the Archaeological Superintendence of Bologna Cod. RPS 120/2014 INTAGLIO Imperial Period, I-II century AD Convex oval stone, depicting a dolphin. Glyptic, or "glyptic art", covers the field of small carved stones, including cylinder seals and inscriptions, especially in an archaeological context. Though they were keenly collected in antiquity, most carved gems originally functioned as seals, often mounted in a ring; intaglio designs register most clearly when viewed by the recipient of a letter as an impression in hardened wax. A finely carved seal was practical, as it made forgery more difficult - the distinctive personal signature did not really exist in antiquity. 0-100 AD Height 1 cm; Width 1.3 cm